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Database - Alliance francophone pour l'accouchement respecté (AFAR)

Description of this bibliographical database (AFAR website)
Currently 3053 records
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https://afar.info/id=1982

Created on : 16 Jun 2006
Modified on : 02 Dec 2007

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Bibliographical entry (without author) :

Effect of timing of umbilical cord clamping on iron status in Mexican infants: a randomised controlled trial. {Mexique}. The Lancet 2006; 367:1997-2004

Author(s) :

Chaparro CM, Neufeld LM, Tena Alavez G, et al.

Year of publication :

2006

URL(s) :

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/P…

Résumé (français)  :

Abstract (English)  :

Background

Delayed clamping of the umbilical cord increases the infant’s iron endowment at birth and haemoglobin concentration at 2 months of age. We aimed to assess whether a 2-minute delay in the clamping of the umbilical cord of normal-weight, full-term infants improved iron and haematological status up to 6 months of age.
Methods

476 mother-infant pairs were recruited at a large obstetrics hospital in Mexico City, Mexico, randomly assigned to delayed clamping (2 min after delivery of the infant’s shoulders) or early clamping (around 10 s after delivery), and followed up until 6 months postpartum. Primary outcomes were infant haematological status and iron status at 6 months of age, and analysis was by intention-to-treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00298051.
Findings

358 (75%) mother-infant pairs completed the trial. At 6 months of age, infants who had delayed clamping had significantly higher mean corpuscular volume (81·0 fL vs 79·5 fL 95% CI −2·5 to −0·6, p=0.001), ferritin (50·7 μg/L vs 34·4 μg/L 95% CI −30·7 to −1·9, p=0·0002), and total body iron. The effect of delayed clamping was significantly greater for infants born to mothers with low ferritin at delivery, breastfed infants not receiving iron-fortified milk or formula, and infants born with birthweight between 2500 g and 3000 g. A cord clamping delay of 2 minutes increased 6-month iron stores by about 27–47 mg.
Interpretation

Delay in cord clamping of 2 minutes could help prevent iron deficiency from developing before 6 months of age, when iron-fortified complementary foods could be introduced.

Sumário (português)  :

Comments :

Argument (français) :

Clamper le cordon au bout de 2mn au lieu de 2s réduit le risque d’anémie chez les nourrissons de moins de 6 mois. Mais pourquoi donc clamper le cordon ?

Argument (English):

Argumento (português):

Keywords :

➡ evidence-based medicine/midwifery ; newborn care

Author of this record :

Cécile Loup — 16 Jun 2006

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This database is managed by Alliance francophone pour l'accouchement respecté (AFAR, https://afar.info)
affiliated with Collectif interassociatif autour de la naissance (CIANE, https://ciane.net).
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